Who We Are & What We Do

Who We Are & What We Do

Lidl was founded in Germany in the 1930s and first entered the UK food market in 1994. We currently have over 750 stores trading Nationwide and are proud to be one of the UK’s leading retailers.

  • The Lidl retail philosophy centres on simplicity and maximum efficiency at every stage of the business, from supplier to customer, enabling the company to sell high quality products from a limited range of exclusive own brand and well-known labels at the lowest prices;
  • Lidl were voted Grocer of the Year at The Grocer Gold Awards 2015, Best Supermarket at the Good Housekeeping Awards in 2016 and Supermarket of the Year and Multiple Spirits Retailer of the Year at the Drinks Retailing Awards in 2017. We have also won accolades at the Great Taste Awards 2017, the International Wine & Spirit Competition 2017, The Grocer Own Label Food & Drink Awards 2017; the Made for Mums Awards 2017 and the BBC Good Food Christmas Trade Awards 2017;
  • Lidl stores sell a limited range of carefully selected product lines and are able to offer these high quality products at low prices due to a pan European bulk purchasing policy; Lidl own a number of their key supply chains and so are able to control cost and efficiency throughout the chain. Offering this limited range gives Lidl immense buying power and allows us to keep our low prices whilst ensuring the quality of our range; and
  • A common misconception is that Lidl will have an adverse impact upon existing town centres but in fact a Competition Commission report confirmed that Lidl provides a different retail offer in comparison to the main food retailers or ‘Big 4’, such as Tesco and Sainsbury’s. This has also been acknowledged by the Secretary of State and Planning Inspectors in their decisions following public inquiries into Lidl schemes, and is shown in a study undertaken by RPS in 2009 which examined a selection of ‘out of town centre’ Lidl stores and identified that after trading for more than 12 months they had generally had only a minimal impact upon the functionality of town centres.